Young cannabis smokers run risk of lower IQ

28 August 2012
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A study claims that young cannabis smokers run risk of lower IQ. The findings come from a study of around 1,000 people in New Zealand. For more than 20 years researchers have followed the lives of a group of people from Dunedin in New Zealand. An international team found those who started using cannabis in adolescence  suffered a drop in IQ. This might might have affected their still developing brains. This study also showed that cognitive performance was restored when the use of cannabis was stopped. Read more on the BBC website…

Research shows that texting and driving don’t go well together

24 August 2012
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Communications professor Zheng Wang of Ohio State University found that when subjects were hit with two visual challenges — concentrating on images on a computer screen while text messaging — their performance plummeted. Their visual capacity was, to some degree, overwhelmed. Their performance also suffered if they concentrated on the images while talking on the phone, thus using different sources of stimuli, audio and visual. But it was not nearly as difficult as when both challenges were of the same type. Read more…

Why some people leap in front of bullets?

23 August 2012
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Two researchers Selwyn Becker and Alice Eagly published in the journal American Psychologist in 2004, that the idea of heroism exists in virtually every human culture ever recorded — from cave paintings and folklore to the dawn of literature and right up to, say, “The Dark Knight Rises.” This might explain why heroism is part of human nature and explain our beahviour when faced with danger in a group situation. Read more… Or watch the video of two children heroes following an attack on their temple.

Alcohol ads target young children

21 August 2012
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Read this very interesting article on the studies carried out by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health on alcohol ads. In brief, most ads contain for example sexual themes. These ads facilitated addiction behaviours. Read more…

The hedonic adaptation

20 August 2012
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Psychologists call this phenomenon hedonic adaptation – the idea is that no matter how good something makes us feel (or, for the record, how bad), most of the time we drift back to where we started, emotionally-speaking. As showed in various studies showed that despite their initial euphoria, lottery winners were no happier than non-winners eighteen months later.  The same tendency to return to “baseline” has been shown to occur after marriage, voluntary job changes, and promotions – the kinds of things we usually expect to change our happiness and well-being for the better in a permanent...

A study in the UK links more than 1000 suicides to the recession

19 August 2012
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A study, a so-called time-trend analysis which compared the actual number of suicides with those expected if pre-recession trends had continued, reflects findings elsewhere in Europe where suicides are also on the rise. “This a grim reminder after the euphoria of the Olympics of the challenges we face and those that lie ahead,” said David Stuckler, a sociologist at Cambridge University who co-led the study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ). Read more…

Children lack of self-control linked to extra weight

18 August 2012
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Children who had less patience and worse self-control while waiting for treats in a classic behavior study ended up weighing slightly more as adults, a new analysis shows. Does it mean emotional intelligence might be a factor in weight gaining? Read more…