How cancer affects relationships

29 October 2013
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Jennie Bushnell and her husband Dan had been together six years when she was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Since she was pregnant with their second child and they chose to delay treatment until after the baby was born, they didn’t tell their families right away. “We were each other’s only confidant,” says Jennie. “We were each other’s only shoulder to lean on, because we didn’t know what our future would be at that point.” From then on their bond got even stronger—through endless doctors appointments and six months of treatment. According...

Study shows men really do ogle women’s bodies

29 October 2013
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Sarah Gervais, assistant professor of psychology and women’s studies at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, and Mike Dodd, associate professor of psychology, watch as graduate student Gerald McDonnell demonstrates the eye-track hardware and software used for the eye-tracking research.(Photo: Craig Chandler) Story Highlights But women look at other women, too Both sexes fixed their gaze more on women’s chests and waists and less on faces Men rate women’s personality also on their looks — more curvy women had “better personalities” The eyes don’t lie:...

Hurricane Sandy: Dealing with the psychological scars one year later

29 October 2013
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When Hurricane Sandy hit the eastern coast of the United States just one year ago, many families in New Jersey and its surrounding states suffered unimaginable losses.  Approximately 147 people died as a result of the storm, and an estimated 650,000 homes were either completely destroyed or damaged by disease-ridden flood waters. While the flooding eventually receded and some of the badly damaged homes have since been rebuilt, the psychological effects of Hurricane Sandy still remain for many residents on the East Coast.  And with Tuesday, October 29 marking the one-year anniversary of the superstorm,...

Researchers link poverty and parenting to child brain development

29 October 2013
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By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK | Mon Oct 28, 2013 4:41pm EDT NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Children who grow up in poor families may have smaller brains than their more well-off peers, says a new study. But good parenting may help overcome that disadvantage. Researchers found that kids who grew up poor tended to have smaller hippocampus and amygdala volumes. Those areas of the brain are partly responsible for regulating memory and emotions. “Generally speaking, larger brains within a certain range of normal are healthier brains,” Dr. Joan Luby, the study’s lead author, said....

Alzheimer’s insight from DNA study

29 October 2013
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27 October 2013 Last updated at 14:03 ET By James Gallagher Health and science reporter, BBC News The exact causes of Alzheimer’s are unknown A clearer picture of what causes Alzheimer’s disease is emerging after the largest ever analysis of patients’ DNA. A massive international collaboration has now doubled the number of genes linked to the dementia to 21. The findings, published in the journal Nature Genetics, indicate a strong role for the immune system. ...

Program offers example for police and mentally ill

07 October 2013
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Alleged gunman Aaron Alexis moves through the hallways of Building 197 at the Washington Navy Yard.(Photo: FBI via AP) Story Highlights Training offers help to police who confront mentally ill suspects Recent Navy Yard shooting offers example of difficulties of the problem 20% of polices calls involve people who shows signs of mental illness, experts say WASHINGTON — When Newport, R.I., police officers Seth Moseley and Eric Cormier were summoned in August to a Marriott Hotel, they found a distressed 34-year-old man struggling with imaginary demons vying for control of his mind. The man reported...

Cocaine may make people more susceptible to HIV

07 October 2013
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Cocaine users may be putting themselves at an increased risk of contracting HIV. A new study published in the October issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology found that cocaine use can affect certain immune system cells that increase a person’s vulnerability to the HIV infection. The researchers found that using cocaine makes inactive CD4 T-cells — immune cells that normally can fight off the HIV virus — more easily infected by HIV. Cocaine was also found to boost the spread of the virus through the cells. “We ultimately hope that our studies will provide a better understanding...

Brain problems can linger months after ICU stay

07 October 2013
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By Gene Emery NEW YORK | Thu Oct 3, 2013 2:03pm EDT NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Critically-ill people who end up spending days in an intensive care unit (ICU) often develop thinking and memory problems, according to a new study. Even when people recover from their physical illness, those problems can persist for more than a year after their hospital stay, researchers said. They found ICU patients who were delirious – severely confused and unable to focus – were especially likely to go on to have thinking and memory problems. “The longer you are delirious, the more likely...

Deleted genes ‘offer autism clues’

07 October 2013
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3 October 2013 Last updated at 12:12 ET The discovery of “missing” genes could help scientists understand how autism develops, a study suggests. US researchers looked at the genetic profiles of more than 431 people with an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and 379 without. They found those with an ASD were more likely to have just one copy of certain genes, when they should have had two. UK experts said genetic factors were one promising area of research into the causes of autism. ...

Why are there still so few women in science?

07 October 2013
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The new study goes a long way toward providing hard evidence of a continuing bias against women in the sciences. Only one-fifth of physics Ph.D.’s in this country are awarded to women, and only about half of those women are American; of all the physics professors in the United States, only 14 percent are women. The numbers of black and Hispanic scientists are even lower; in a typical year, 13 African-Americans and 20 Latinos of either sex receive Ph.D.’s in physics. The reasons for those shortages are hardly mysterious — many minority students attend secondary schools that leave them too...

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