Optimistic women more likely to have healthy habits

28 March 2014
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Women with a sunny disposition may also have an easier time adopting healthy habits, according to a new study. Researchers found that women who were more optimistic were better able to follow healthy eating guidelines, both when they were instructed to do so and when they chose to make changes on their own. The authors noted that the biggest help for making diet improvements is not necessarily optimism itself, but the skills that tend to go with it. “It’s not just having a sunny outlook – rather, this is a marker of other things people do,” said Melanie Hingle, a dietician...

1 in 68 Kids Has Autism, CDC Says

28 March 2014
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By Katie Moisse@katiemoisseFollow on Twitter One in 68 kids has autism, according to new study that suggests the developmental disorder is on the rise. The sobering new stat, based on 2010 data released today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, represents a 29 percent increase in autism prevalence since 2008 and a 62 percent increase since 2006. One in 42 boys and one in 189 girls fall on the autism spectrum, according to the study. “The number of children identified with autism continues to increase and the characteristics of these children have changed over time,” said...

Self injury information available online, but rarely accurate

28 March 2014
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NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Keywords related to self-injury were searched more than 42 million times in the past year, according to a new study, but what those searches turned up was mostly myths and misinformation. Researchers cataloged and analyzed websites related to nonsuicidal self-injury – which is physically injuring oneself intentionally without attempting suicide – and found less than 10 percent of the sites were endorsed by health or academic institutions. “For many people it’s a first step and if what they’re getting is poor quality that’s a...

Study: Migraines triggered by stress relief?

28 March 2014
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Those who suffer from migraines have likely heard that stress can be a powerful trigger, but new research suggests that it’s the comedown after the craziness that brings on the pain. In a small study involving 17 migraine patients, researchers at the Montefiore Headache Center in New York City examined headache and stress diaries that patients filled out twice a day for at least 30 days using a smart phone app; they found that migraines were nearly twice as likely to occur within six to 18 hours after a sharp drop in stress—rather than during the anxious period itself. “Migraines...

Autism ‘begins long before birth’

28 March 2014
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26 March 2014 Last updated at 20:48 ET By Helen Briggs BBC News Pregnancy: problems in brain development in the womb may underpin autism Scientists say they have new evidence that autism begins in the womb. Patchy changes in the developing brain long before birth may cause symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), research suggests. The study, in the New England Journal of Medicine, raises hopes that better understanding of the brain may improve the lives of children with autism....

Activity levels in mothers and children ‘directly linked’

25 March 2014
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24 March 2014 Last updated at 02:02 ET The more active a mother is, the more physically active her child will be, suggests a UK study of 500 mums and four-year-olds. But many mothers’ exercise levels fell way below recommended levels, it said. Researchers from Cambridge and Southampton universities used heart-rate monitors to measure activity levels over seven days. The study, published in Pediatrics, said policies to improve children’s health should be aimed at mothers....

Study shows violent video games may be tied to aggressive thoughts

25 March 2014
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NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Playing violent video games may be linked to violent thoughts and behavior among kids, according to a new study. The report, based on data from Singapore, found that kids who often play violent video games end up showing more aggression later on, and more often believe hitting is acceptable, than kids who don’t play them. Parental monitoring of gaming didn’t seem to lessen the association. “Just like children’s bodies can be affected by what they eat, their brains can be affected by what they repeatedly do,” Douglas A. Gentile told...

Something else for women to fret about: A greater risk of Alzheimer’s

25 March 2014
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More good news for women (not): More of them are suffering from Alzheimer’s disease than men. The Alzheimer’s Assn.’s recently released annual report on the grim facts and figures of this debilitating disease and other related dementias says that an estimated 3.2 million women aged 65 and older in the U.S. are living with Alzheimer’s. That’s two-thirds of the 5 million seniors in America with the disease. Just looking at this statistically, the association reports that 65-year-old women not afflicted with Alzheimer’s still have a 1 in 6 chance of getting it. Men that age have...

Coping when not entering retirement together

25 March 2014
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As military sex cases end, more calls for change

22 March 2014
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At nearly the same time Thursday, sexual assault cases against an Army general and a former Naval Academy football player came to a close, and neither produced a conviction on that charge. Some members in Congress and advocates for women said the results were more proof the military justice system needs an overhaul. On the other side of the debate, people say the system worked like it was supposed to because, they say, neither case should have gone to trial in the first place. Still, no one disagreed the military has a pervasive problem of sexual assaults within its ranks, and the cases served...

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