Why driving slowly and responsibly can actually be fun

21 June 2014
0

Gamification can make eco-friendly driving habits enjoyable. (Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/EPA) Let’s get the bad news out of the way. We can no longer afford to mash the gas pedal and enjoy the rush of lightning-quick acceleration and traveling at high speeds. In light of climate change, our habits will have to change dramatically to avoid dire outcomes. Gas-guzzlers are out, four-cylinder engines and electric cars are in. Goodbye acceleration that leaves skid marks, hello boring trips from point A to B. Fortunately, there may be a silver lining. Car manufacturers are taking steps to make driving...

Would you want to know if you’re likely to get Alzheimer’s disease?

21 June 2014
0

Margaret Woodley-Krug, right, and her mother, Marie Cunningham, at their home in Waldorf, Md. Woodley-Krug, 65, is participating in a trial of a drug designed to prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease.  Cunningham, 86, suffers from dementia. (Andre Chung for The Washington Post) Last month, I wrote about the problems that pharmaceutical companies and other researchers have recruiting sufficient numbers of volunteers for clinical trials of medications that may prove valuable against a wide variety of disorders. Here is one example of how that may affect people who might benefit from that research. ...

Study: Less-structured time correlates to kids’ success

21 June 2014
0

Research found that young children who spend more time engaging in more open-ended, free-flowing activities display higher levels of executive functioning, and vice versa Parents, drop your planners—a new psychological study released Tuesday found that children with less-structured time are likely to show more “self-directed executive functioning,” otherwise known as the “cognitive processes that regulate thought and action in support of goal-oriented behavior.” Doctoral and undergraduate researchers at University of Colorado, Boulder, followed 70 children ranging from six to seven years...

New findings shed light on maternal mental illness

17 June 2014
0

Log in to manage your products and services from The New York Times and the International New York Times. Don’t have an account yet?Create an account » Subscribed through iTunes and need an NYTimes.com account?Learn more » Source Article from http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/16/health/thinking-of-ways-to-harm-her.html

Teens are drinking, smoking and fighting less, but screen time is up

17 June 2014
0

NEW YORK — American teens are smoking less, drinking less and fighting less. But they’re texting behind the wheel and spending a lot of time on video games and computers, according to the government’s latest study of worrisome behavior. Generally speaking, the news is good. Most forms of drug use, weapons use and risky sex have been decreasing since the government started doing the biennial survey in 1991. Teens are wearing bicycle helmets and seat belts more, too. “Overall, young people have more healthy behaviors than they did 20 years ago,” said Stephanie Zaza, who oversees the risky-behavior...

The five most stressed states in America

10 June 2014
0

The only stress category where Florida didn’t make the top 10 was hours worked.AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File Florida is the most stressed-out state in the lower 48 and that has nothing to do with pythons, shark attacks, or drug-dealing mayors, according to a new study. Real-estate blog Movoto used factors including commuting times, housing prices, and lack of health insurance to arrive at its findings. It ranked the Sunshine State first because of high unemployment, at 11.3%, and the fact that 25.8% of its population doesn’t have health insurance. ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISEMENT The rest...

Patients’ end-of-life wishes granted

10 June 2014
0

Patients who document their end-of-life wishes using a special medical form get the specific care they want in their final days, according to a study published online in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University looked at the growing use of the voluntary form, called Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or Polst. The document lets patients request or refuse certain medical treatments such as CPR or intensive care. The study is the largest… Source Article from http://online.wsj.com/articles/patients-end-of-life-wishes-granted-study-finds-1402285059

Born this way: Stories of young transgender children

10 June 2014
0

Our Cover Story this morning deals with children grappling with a very grown-up issue: gender identity — boys or girls believing they’re the opposite sex, saying they were born this way. Here’s Rita Braver: She could be any 12-year-old girl, hanging out with her mom and sister, but Zoey was biologically born a boy. “So how did you handle it when people related to you as a boy?” asked Braver. “Yeah, I always get upset,” she replied. “I would be like, ‘No, I’m not a boy. I’m a girl. You know, like, I like the color pink, I scream like...

RU ready to quit smoking? Texting can help

10 June 2014
0

i i hide captionWant a cig? Researcher Lorien Abroms displays a sample Text2Quit message. William Atkins/George Washington University Want a cig? Researcher Lorien Abroms displays a sample Text2Quit message. William Atkins/George Washington University Smokers who want to quit have all sorts of tools at their disposal: call lines, nicotine patches, medication, friends, doctors. And now, texts. Getting counseling through text messages doubled the odds of kicking the habit compared with those who relied on Internet searches and basic information brochures, a study published Friday in the American...

1 <- 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 -> 52