The secret behind computer game addiction?

24 October 2012
0

The success of the simple puzzle game Tetris may be down to the brain’s desire for tidiness. The Zeigarnik Effect, whereby unresolved problems stick in the mind, even if they are forgotten immediately afterwards, may hold the key to why so many millions of hours have been spent, across the globe on games like Tetris. The same phenomena can also be identified in the prolific expansion of online games such as the Sims: taking advantage of our natural desire to tidy up lose ends. Read more on the BBC here

The psychology of football

20 October 2012
0

Richard Lee, professional footballer, author and well read, amateur psychologist attributes his positive approach to the power of psychology. He is an active promoter of the use of psychotherapeutic tools in the sport and an advocate of the “psychology of football.” “At times of crisis of confidence, personal doubt or injury, especially recurring injuries, the kind of mental processes I’ve been able to put in place really do help” Richard Lee, Brentford FC goalkeeper Read more here

Can young blood refresh the brain cells other elixirs cannot reach?

19 October 2012
0

We have all heard the legends of vampers, living for centuries on the blood of young women. Now, researchers form Stamford University have shown that not only can brain cell growth in old adults be promoted by the infusion of blood from adolescents, but that these changes are directly linked to improved memory and further tests have demonstrated improvement of recall in subjects. At the moment the tests have been restricted to mice but the medical and social impact of these results should be interesting. Read more here 

Deterioration in male mental health in the UK linked to recession.

18 October 2012
0

A Medical Research Council study, published on BMJ Open on the 17th October,  indicates that levels of anxiety and depression in men rise significantly during times of recession, hitting 16.4% in 2009 and with a similar peek during the 1991-3 recession. The effect can be seen even in those men not directly effected by unemployment or reduced family income. “These recent analyses confirm that the threat of unemployment is in itself harmful” Prof Justine Schneider Read more here:

The UK set to become global leader on dementia research

13 October 2012
0

As part of the British Government’s “Challenge on Dementia” a showcase, event (UK Dementia Research: Addressing the Global Challenge) was held on the 10th October 2012 to bring together more than 150 potential international partners in order to promote the UK’s unique research university facilities, combined with NHS patient data. “The UK wants to be a world-leader in dementia research, but only by international collaboration can we tackle the global challenge of this condition.” Norman Lamb, Care and Support Minister Read more here

Three genes determine your child’s academic achievement

11 October 2012
0

Kevin Beaver of Florida State University has identified that three genes DAT1, DRD2 and DRD4 predict levels of academic achievement. So does this mean that we are soon to be condemned to a world in which our lives are determined at birth, populated by genetic elites and a DNA underclass? The vision of our future depicted in the 1997 film Gattaca (pictured) highlights the age old struggle between nature and nurture, predetermined potential and the benefits and disadvantages afforded to us by our environment. The 1994 book “The Bell Curve” argues for accepting the determinist view and...

A whole new way of thinking about memory consolidation theory

10 October 2012
0

A recent study at the UCLA has demonstrated that there is persistent activity within the entorhinal cortex during sleep, and charted the sequence of neurone influence through differing areas of the brain.  “The big surprise here is that this kind of persistent activity is happening during sleep, pretty much all the time.” “This is a whole new way of thinking about memory consolidation theory. We found there is a new player involved in this process and it’s having an enormous impact” Mayank R. Mehta, UCLA (The whole article is available on Nature Neuroscience) Read...

One quarter of the British workforce have been diagnosed as depressed

09 October 2012
0

Despite the highest diagnosed rate of depression in Europe, British workers may be no more likely to suffer from the condition then those in other European countries. Do the results of this study really indicate that the NHS is just better at diagnosing patients with depression? If 26% of the population have been diagnosed, what is the real number of sufferers? “People themselves have got better at recognising it, and doctors have got better at diagnosing it and supporting patients.” Emer O’Neill, chief executive of Depression Alliance Read more in the Telegraph

Young cannabis smokers run risk of lower IQ

28 August 2012
0

A study claims that young cannabis smokers run risk of lower IQ. The findings come from a study of around 1,000 people in New Zealand. For more than 20 years researchers have followed the lives of a group of people from Dunedin in New Zealand. An international team found those who started using cannabis in adolescence  suffered a drop in IQ. This might might have affected their still developing brains. This study also showed that cognitive performance was restored when the use of cannabis was stopped. Read more on the BBC website…

Study shows a link between brain structure and altruism

21 July 2012
0

A new study from the University of Zurich in Switzerland suggests that the answer to that question may be a matter of neuroanatomy, with the brains of altruistic types having more “gray matter” in a region of the brain known as the temporoparietal junction. Read more here…

1 2 3