Obesity leads to permanent physiological changes in the brain.

04 October 2012
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A recent study, run by the American University’s Centre for Behavioral Neuroscience, showed that subjects who became obese through high sugar and fatty diets, suffered permanent changes to their hippocampus, resulting in a heightened appetite and memory impairment. “What I think is happening is a vicious cycle of obesity and cognitive decline,” Read more here

Low Pay Stresses Workers The Most

19 September 2012
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From Forbes Magazine: Nearly three quarters (73%) of American workers are stressed out on the job, and the No. 1 reason is low pay, according to a new study by Harris Interactive for Everest College. The study was conducted by phone among 898 adults, 18 years old and up, between June 21 and July 1. Read more

Childhood trauma hikes the risk of impulsive and addictive behaviour

18 September 2012
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New research from the University of Cambridge suggests a traumatic upbringing during childhood can lead to personality traits such as impulsivity or compulsiveness. Impulsivity or compulsiveness, in turn, are linked to an increased risk of addiction. In the study, Cambridge researchers aimed to identify risk factors that make a person vulnerable to developing drug dependence. They examined 50 adults with cocaine dependence together with their biological brothers and sisters who have never abused drugs. All participants underwent extensive assessments of their personalities, including their ways...

Early Music Lessons Have Longtime Benefits

17 September 2012
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From the NYT Well-Blog: When children learn to play a musical instrument, they strengthen a range of auditory skills. Recent studies suggest that these benefits extend all through life, at least for those who continue to be engaged with music. But a study published last month is the first to show that music lessons in childhood may lead to changes in the brain that persist years after the lessons stop. Researchers at Northwestern University recorded the auditory brainstem responses of college students — that is to say, their electrical brain waves — in response to complex sounds. The group...

Can social media make you fat?

15 September 2012
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Time spent on social networking sites comes at the expense of other activities — including physical activity, new research by the University of Ulster has revealed. Around 350 students at the University of Ulster completed an online survey -measuring social networking activity and levels of physical activity. When the results were analysed, researchers found that the amount of time spent on social network websites was negatively correlated with the respondents’ level of physical activity. Read more

Robots teaching how to know if somebody is trustworthy

11 September 2012
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An unusual new study of college students’ interactions with a robot has shed light on why we intuitively trust some people and distrust others. While many people assume that behaviors like avoiding eye contact and fidgeting are signals that a person is being dishonest, scientists have found that no single gesture or expression consistently predicts trustworthiness. Read more

Phone based psychotherapy helps depression

07 July 2012
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A recent randomised control trial research has shown that phone based cognitive behavioural therapy can help people suffering from depression. Read more.

Emotional freedom technique

05 July 2012
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Emotional freedom technique is an approach that helps people with severe anxiety. It uses acupressure techniques and visualisation that help to alleviate anxiety.

Become a cyber hero!

04 July 2012
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A researcher from Saybrook University has found that online communities can harness our best impulses and turn members into “cyber-heroes,” able to make a difference. Dr. Dana Klisanin has identified a new type of personality style emerging worldwide: the “cyberhero”. Read more here.

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