Cute cats could be key to learning new languages

28 November 2013
0

26 November 2013 Last updated at 19:08 ET By Carolyn Rice Technology reporter, BBC News Will these cute creatures help learners to remember their foreign phrases? Amusing photos of cats may provide hours of entertainment for people browsing online but can they be used to help people remember things? Funny cat photos and videos have become an online fascination in the last few years and have even created “superstars” like Grumpy Cat and Nyan Cat. One is a real-life miserable-looking...

Scientists discover brain part that drives decision-making

25 November 2013
0

A tiny part of the brain may be what’s behind your big decisions. Canadian scientists say they’ve discovered that a part of the brain called the lateral habenula may help us make major cost-benefit decisions like buying a new house. The study “suggests that the scientific community has misunderstood the true functioning of this mysterious, but important, region of the brain,” study author Dr. Stan Floresco, a behavioral neuroscientist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, said in a statement. The new research...

Screening children for mental health issues may not guarantee care

25 November 2013
0

Six years after the state launched an unprecedented effort to address the mental and developmental needs of young children, doctors in Massachusetts are screening more children for behavioral health concerns than any other state. Nearly 7 in 10 Massachusetts children under age 6 in low-income families were screened in 2011 and 2012 — more than twice the rate in the United States as a whole, according to data released this month by the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center as part of the national Kids Count report. Doctors in North Carolina, which had the second highest rate, screened just over...

Art makes you smart

25 November 2013
0

FOR many education advocates, the arts are a panacea: They supposedly increase test scores, generate social responsibility and turn around failing schools. Most of the supporting evidence, though, does little more than establish correlations between exposure to the arts and certain outcomes. Research that demonstrates a causal relationship has been virtually nonexistent. A few years ago, however, we had a rare opportunity to explore such relationships when the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opened in Bentonville, Ark. Through a large-scale, random-assignment study of school tours to the...

ADHD diagnoses rise to 11% of kids

25 November 2013
0

The number of children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) continues to climb, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There has been a 42% increase in the number of reported cases of ADHD since 2003, according to a CDC-led study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Today, 6.4 million children between the ages of 4 and 17 – 11% of kids in this age group – have received an ADHD diagnosis, according to the study, which is based on a survey of parents. That’s 2 million more...

Big cities most likely to have progressive gay-rights laws

20 November 2013
0

The nation’s largest cities are most likely to have laws that benefit gays and lesbians, while smaller cities and those in the South are least likely to accommodate homosexuals, according to a new survey. And in red states, where gay-rights advocates have been rebuffed in state legislatures, liberal cities are proving more fertile territory for anti-discrimination and partner benefit legislation. The Municipal Equality Index, to be published Tuesday by the Human Rights Campaign and the Equality Federation Institute rates cities on a host of gay-rights issues using a 100-point scale. The groups...

Brain stimulation may treat bulimia

20 November 2013
0

A mild electrical stimulation to a specific brain area could be an effective treatment for some patients with eating disorders such as bulimia, who suffer from episodes of severe binge eating and purging behaviors, researchers say. After one 42-year-old woman received the electrical stimulation, called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), as a treatment for her depression, and showed an unexpected recovery from her 20-year battle against bulimia nervosa, her doctors conducted a pilot study to see whether the treatment would also work for other patients with eating disorders, said Dr. Jonathan...

That lovin’ feeling: Men’s brains respond to gentle touch

20 November 2013
0

Health Nov. 18, 2013 at 2:01 PM ET Sometimes, science requires test tubes and Petri dishes. And other times, it involves stroking men wearing only their underpants. In a new study, researchers from Aalto University in Finland imaged the brains of scantily clad men who were being gently touched by their partners. The social contact activated chemicals in the brain’s opioid system that may be critical for maintaining social bonds with others. From romantic partners to family members, humans maintain many long-term...

Early care for psychosis catches on, raises questions

20 November 2013
0

The early stages of psychosis often go unnoticed, are mistreated or not treated at all.(Photo: USA TODAY) Story Highlights NYC hospitals may soon contact health officials about every new case of psychosis in young people Special clinics that offer early treatment are “ready for prime time,” one expert says Still uncertain: how to treat high-risk teens and young adults before psychosis sets in For years, Lisa Halpern says she was able to explain away and conceal the early warning signs of psychosis. When she hid in her college dorm room, with towels stuffed under the door and black paper...

1 2 3