Texas county adopts sweeping policy to protect LGBT inmates

15 November 2013
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HOUSTON –  The sheriff of Houston’s Harris County has adopted a sweeping policy designed to protect and guarantee equal treatment of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender inmates, including allowing transgender individuals to be housed based on the gender they identify with instead of their biological sex. The new policy, which Harris County Sheriff Adrian Garcia’s office believes to be one of the most comprehensive in the country, states “discrimination or harassment of any kind based on sexual orientation or gender identity is strictly prohibited,” and outlines how...

How best to manage workplace bullying

15 November 2013
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Copyright © 2013 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required. RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: Allegations that Miami Dolphins players harassed one of their own teammates got us thinking about other subtle forms of intimidation that can happen in the workplace. One out of every three people report being bullied on the job. That’s according to a survey done by the Workplace Bullying Institute. Its director, Gary Namie, spoke to NPR’s Linda Wertheimer. He told her bullying happens across income levels but that it’s more likely to...

‘Widowhood effect’ strongest during first three months

15 November 2013
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NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – When a husband or wife dies, the surviving spouse faces a higher risk of dying over the next few months as well, according to a new report. Previous studies have looked at the so-called widowhood effect. But it wasn’t completely clear how long the effect lasts. “The widowhood question is interesting because it is ubiquitous. At some point or the other one partner will die leaving the other and this will happen to everyone regardless of class, caste, socioeconomic status,” Dr. S. V. Subramanian told Reuters Health in an email. He worked on the...

Depression ‘makes us biologically older’

14 November 2013
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12 November 2013 Last updated at 04:50 ET By Michelle Roberts Health editor, BBC News online Depression can make us physically older by speeding up the ageing process in our cells, according to a study. Lab tests showed cells looked biologically older in people who were severely depressed or who had been in the past. These visible differences in a measure of cell ageing called telomere length couldn’t be explained by other factors, such as whether a person smoked. The findings,...

Depression ‘makes us biologically older’

13 November 2013
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12 November 2013 Last updated at 04:50 ET By Michelle Roberts Health editor, BBC News online Depression can make us physically older by speeding up the ageing process in our cells, according to a study. Lab tests showed cells looked biologically older in people who were severely depressed or who had been in the past. These visible differences in a measure of cell ageing called telomere length couldn’t be explained by other factors, such as whether a person smoked. The findings,...

Depression ‘makes us biologically older’

13 November 2013
0

12 November 2013 Last updated at 04:50 ET By Michelle Roberts Health editor, BBC News online Depression can make us physically older by speeding up the ageing process in our cells, according to a study. Lab tests showed cells looked biologically older in people who were severely depressed or who had been in the past. These visible differences in a measure of cell ageing called telomere length couldn’t be explained by other factors, such as whether a person smoked. The findings,...

Long-term benefits of music lessons

13 November 2013
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“It didn’t matter what instrument you played, it just mattered that you played,” said Nina Kraus, a neuroscientist at Northwestern University and an author of the study, which appears in The Journal of Neuroscience. She and her collaborators looked at 44 healthy adults ages 55 to 76, measuring electrical activity in a region of the brain that processes sound. They found that participants who had four to 14 years of musical training had faster responses to speech sounds than participants without any training — even though no one in the first group had played an instrument for about 40 years....

Transgender veterans fight for military paperwork to match new gender

13 November 2013
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Paula M. Neira thrived in the U.S. Navy for six years, serving at home and at sea in mine warfare combat during Operation Desert Storm, culling numerous awards. After leaving the military in 1991, she went to law school and then went on to become a registered nurse and educator at a major hospital in Maryland. But Neira is transgender, and during those years of decorated service she was known as Paul, and all her military records reflect that name. Today she lives openly as female, but her name and physical appearance don’t match her discharge paperwork, or what the U.S. Department of Defense...

C-sections not tied to obesity later on

13 November 2013
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Babies born by cesarean deliveries are no more likely to be obese later in life than babies born vaginally, says a new study. Despite some past research suggesting a link, Australian researchers found 21-year-olds’ weights and waist sizes weren’t tied to the way they had been delivered. “This data does not support the idea that C-section is the reason we have childhood and increasing obesity rates,” Dr. Loralei Thornburg said. She is a high-risk pregnancy expert at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York, but wasn’t involved in the study. “Although...

Concussed rugby players being put at risk

08 November 2013
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LONDON (Reuters) – Rugby players with brain damage are regularly being sent back onto the field of play because the sport’s governing bodies are not taking concussion seriously enough, medical experts said on Thursday. The long-term risks of this could be higher rates of dementia, major depression and other neurodegenerative conditions later in life, the experts said, with evidence of such problems already being found among American football players who suffer similar rates of knocks to the head. Barry O’Driscoll, a former International Rugby Board medical advisor who spoke to...

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