Aspergers and ADHD patients to have doctors appointments over Skype

06 October 2012
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Northamptonshire NHS trust has adopted the use of Skype video calling to enable patients suffering from either Aspergers or ADHD to talk with their doctor from the comfort of their own home. It is hoped that the practice will help cut the 10% of missed NHS medical appointments and is already being adopted by other trusts. The full article can be found here.

An end to zero tolerance in American schools?

05 October 2012
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School districts across the US have moved towards smarter disciple programmes and away from mandatory expulsions, in an attempt to tackle student discipline. The American Psychological Association reports that the zero tolerance policy has led to an increase in bad behaviour and has not reduced violence nor promoted learning. The new approach employs restorative practices, which enable students to better understand the consequences of their actions and develops inter student and teacher student relationships. Subscribe to our free online seminar on mental health welfare in schools here. Read the...

Obesity leads to permanent physiological changes in the brain.

04 October 2012
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A recent study, run by the American University’s Centre for Behavioral Neuroscience, showed that subjects who became obese through high sugar and fatty diets, suffered permanent changes to their hippocampus, resulting in a heightened appetite and memory impairment. “What I think is happening is a vicious cycle of obesity and cognitive decline,” Read more here

Kids’ lack of self-control tied to extra weight

21 September 2012
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Preschoolers who had less patience and worse self-control while waiting for treats in a classic behavior study ended up weighing slightly more as adults, a new analysis shows. Read more

Low Pay Stresses Workers The Most

19 September 2012
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From Forbes Magazine: Nearly three quarters (73%) of American workers are stressed out on the job, and the No. 1 reason is low pay, according to a new study by Harris Interactive for Everest College. The study was conducted by phone among 898 adults, 18 years old and up, between June 21 and July 1. Read more

Childhood trauma hikes the risk of impulsive and addictive behaviour

18 September 2012
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New research from the University of Cambridge suggests a traumatic upbringing during childhood can lead to personality traits such as impulsivity or compulsiveness. Impulsivity or compulsiveness, in turn, are linked to an increased risk of addiction. In the study, Cambridge researchers aimed to identify risk factors that make a person vulnerable to developing drug dependence. They examined 50 adults with cocaine dependence together with their biological brothers and sisters who have never abused drugs. All participants underwent extensive assessments of their personalities, including their ways...

Early Music Lessons Have Longtime Benefits

17 September 2012
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From the NYT Well-Blog: When children learn to play a musical instrument, they strengthen a range of auditory skills. Recent studies suggest that these benefits extend all through life, at least for those who continue to be engaged with music. But a study published last month is the first to show that music lessons in childhood may lead to changes in the brain that persist years after the lessons stop. Researchers at Northwestern University recorded the auditory brainstem responses of college students — that is to say, their electrical brain waves — in response to complex sounds. The group...

Can social media make you fat?

15 September 2012
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Time spent on social networking sites comes at the expense of other activities — including physical activity, new research by the University of Ulster has revealed. Around 350 students at the University of Ulster completed an online survey -measuring social networking activity and levels of physical activity. When the results were analysed, researchers found that the amount of time spent on social network websites was negatively correlated with the respondents’ level of physical activity. Read more

Robots teaching how to know if somebody is trustworthy

11 September 2012
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An unusual new study of college students’ interactions with a robot has shed light on why we intuitively trust some people and distrust others. While many people assume that behaviors like avoiding eye contact and fidgeting are signals that a person is being dishonest, scientists have found that no single gesture or expression consistently predicts trustworthiness. Read more

Young cannabis smokers run risk of lower IQ

28 August 2012
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A study claims that young cannabis smokers run risk of lower IQ. The findings come from a study of around 1,000 people in New Zealand. For more than 20 years researchers have followed the lives of a group of people from Dunedin in New Zealand. An international team found those who started using cannabis in adolescence  suffered a drop in IQ. This might might have affected their still developing brains. This study also showed that cognitive performance was restored when the use of cannabis was stopped. Read more on the BBC website…

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