The menstrual cyle mood myth dispelled?

29 October 2012
0

A recent study led by Gillian Einstein evaluated the results of 47 previous research projects into mood and menstrual cycle: “Taken together, these studies failed to provide clear evidence in support of the existence of a specific premenstrual negative mood syndrome in the general population.” The study did not look at those suffering with PMDD but highlights how negative mood may be falsely associated with the menstrual cycle whilst in fact having other causes. Read the report here

Puppies maybe cute but are too young to empathise

28 October 2012
0

A recent Swedish study into yawning responses in dogs found that whilst older dogs tended to yawn and become tired, contagiously, when handlers yawned, puppies under seven months had no such response. This indicates that  empathy in dogs does not develop until late in their 1st year. Children do not demonstrate the same response until around four years of age. Read more here

Parents overestimate their children’s happiness

26 October 2012
0

  It has long been recognised that parents tend to exaggerate their children’s intellectual, social and sporting abilities but a recent study indicated that parents are also inclined to see their children as less anxious and more optimistic  than they really are. Kristin Lagattuta’s research indicates that adult’s interpretations of children’s happiness can not be trusted but hopes that it will lead parents to be better attuned to their children’s emotional difficulties. Read more here

Music to eat macaroons by

25 October 2012
0

Crossmodal perception research at Oxford University has shown how our olfactory perception can be influenced by the sound. For example, eating a piece of toffee whilst listening to the sound of birds might seem sweeter than when eating the same toffee accompanied by the sound of waves on the beach. Read more on how sound and taste are linked here

The secret behind computer game addiction?

24 October 2012
0

The success of the simple puzzle game Tetris may be down to the brain’s desire for tidiness. The Zeigarnik Effect, whereby unresolved problems stick in the mind, even if they are forgotten immediately afterwards, may hold the key to why so many millions of hours have been spent, across the globe on games like Tetris. The same phenomena can also be identified in the prolific expansion of online games such as the Sims: taking advantage of our natural desire to tidy up lose ends. Read more on the BBC here

Can young blood refresh the brain cells other elixirs cannot reach?

19 October 2012
0

We have all heard the legends of vampers, living for centuries on the blood of young women. Now, researchers form Stamford University have shown that not only can brain cell growth in old adults be promoted by the infusion of blood from adolescents, but that these changes are directly linked to improved memory and further tests have demonstrated improvement of recall in subjects. At the moment the tests have been restricted to mice but the medical and social impact of these results should be interesting. Read more here 

Deterioration in male mental health in the UK linked to recession.

18 October 2012
0

A Medical Research Council study, published on BMJ Open on the 17th October,  indicates that levels of anxiety and depression in men rise significantly during times of recession, hitting 16.4% in 2009 and with a similar peek during the 1991-3 recession. The effect can be seen even in those men not directly effected by unemployment or reduced family income. “These recent analyses confirm that the threat of unemployment is in itself harmful” Prof Justine Schneider Read more here:

The Intoxication of Power

14 October 2012
0

Our leaders of industry, our politicians and managers, our public servants and executives, all wield power over us and all come under criticism when decisions they make have negative impacts. To better understand the psychology of power, ‘from neuroscience to hubris’ the Royal Society of Medicine, in association with the Daedalus Trust ran a conference in October 2012: “to integrate emerging knowledge from neuroscience, social sciences and organisational governance to nourish benevolent leadership and create effective constraints to hubris and related conditions” Read...

The UK set to become global leader on dementia research

13 October 2012
0

As part of the British Government’s “Challenge on Dementia” a showcase, event (UK Dementia Research: Addressing the Global Challenge) was held on the 10th October 2012 to bring together more than 150 potential international partners in order to promote the UK’s unique research university facilities, combined with NHS patient data. “The UK wants to be a world-leader in dementia research, but only by international collaboration can we tackle the global challenge of this condition.” Norman Lamb, Care and Support Minister Read more here

Three genes determine your child’s academic achievement

11 October 2012
0

Kevin Beaver of Florida State University has identified that three genes DAT1, DRD2 and DRD4 predict levels of academic achievement. So does this mean that we are soon to be condemned to a world in which our lives are determined at birth, populated by genetic elites and a DNA underclass? The vision of our future depicted in the 1997 film Gattaca (pictured) highlights the age old struggle between nature and nurture, predetermined potential and the benefits and disadvantages afforded to us by our environment. The 1994 book “The Bell Curve” argues for accepting the determinist view and...

1 2 3 4